How to Dehydrate Mangos

Dried mango is a number one fan favorite for kids and adults. It’s naturally sweet and much easier to enjoy as a snack than fresh mango, which is really juicy and sticky.

Unsweetened dried mango is generally the most popular. We also offer a few dehydrated mango recipes, which are next to impossible to resist. These include honey-sweetened and chocolate-covered mangos, as well as pureed and powdered mango for use in meat and dessert recipes.

The best dried mango is made at home, in a fruit dehydrator. You’ll avoid chemical preservatives like sulfur dioxide which, while it’s considered to be safe by the FDA, is still a toxic ingredient.

Dried mango no sugar added

  • 10 mangos
  • 2 tbsp. honey
  • ½ cup lemon juice

Start with fresh, ripe, organic mangos. When you press your fingers into the peel, it should be soft, but not so much that the fruit meat has begun to spoil. This will make it easier to both slice and dehydrate the mango properly.

This can be messy and difficult. Cut both ends of each mango, enough to see the yellow interior. Stand the mango up on one of the flattened sides and carefully peel it using a sharp knife or mango slicer.

Finally, with the peel completely removed, cut the mango fruit into ¼” slices. The length of your mango slices is less important than keeping the thickness consistent, so that they dehydrate evenly.

Set your fruit leather oven to 135 degrees. Combine the honey and lemon juice and stir until consistent, then dip each of the slices in, shaking off residual moisture. The citrus from the lemon juice will keep the mango meat from browning.

Unsweetened dried mango

Simply omit the honey. You’ll retain the natural, sweet tanginess of the mango, as well as preserve its delicious nutrients.

Place the prepared mango slices on your dehydrator trays. Leave space between each piece to allow for air and moisture flow, and effective dehydration.

Dry for 8 hours. Check how pliable the mango dried fruit is, as it should be rather solid and its stickiness should have subsided. Let it dry as long as needed, keeping in mind that the dried mango will moisten slightly after cooling for 30 minutes.

Dehydrated mango recipes

Chocolate covered mango

  • Dehydrated Mango
  • Bittersweet or dark chocolate

Chop the chocolate and warm it in a saucepan over low heat. We recommend dark chocolate for its antioxidant properties, and because it’s so delicious when combined with the natural flavor of mango. Stir frequently, until the chocolate reaches a liquid consistency.

Remove the chocolate from heat and prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper. Dip each of your dehydrated mango slices in the chocolate and place them directly on the baking sheet.

Cool the entire sheet of chocolate-covered mango slices in the refrigerator for 30 minutes. They’re now ready to enjoy or store in zip lock bags!

You can also make a spicy dried mango this way. Simply sprinkle a bit of hot pepper, like cayenne, on the freshly dipped, chocolate mango slices before you harden them in the fridge.

Mango fruit juice in a fruit dryer

You can make your own mango fruit powder by pureeing then drying mango. Simply place whole portions of peeled mango fruit in a fruit processor and liquefy. Add water or fruit juice as necessary for consistency.

Set your dry fruit machine to 135 degrees. Pour the mango puree on solid, non-stick drying trays ¼” thick and dry until solid and unsticky. After cooling for 30 minutes, blend into a fine powder.

You can simply add water to the fruit juice powder. The mango fruit nutrition and flavor will speak for itself, especially since the flavors concentrate and intensify when mango is dehydrated.

fruit jerky dehydrator will work wonders for creating convenient, practical snacks that save you time and money!

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